Data Visualization and D3.js Newsletter Issue 222

DashingD3js.com Weekly Data Visualization and D3.js Newsletter

Hi Friends -


Welcome to issue 222 of the DashingD3js.com Weekly Newsletter.

Onwards to this month's links...
 

Featured
 

  • The History Of Looking At Data Visualizations
    What's interesting about thinking historically about data visualization is that the science itself changes over time, so that both what's stylistically desirable and what a visualization's audience has the cognitive capacity to apprehend changes over time. Studies of perception can tap into psychological constants, but they also invariable hit on cultural conditioning...
  • A Better Way to Code - Introducing d3.express: the integrated discovery environment
    For the last eight years or so, I have been building tools for visualizing information. The most successful outcome of this effort has been D3, a JavaScript library...If we can’t eliminate coding, can we at least make it easier for humans, with our sausage fingers and finite-sized brains?...To explore this question I am building an integrated discovery environment called d3.express. It’s for exploratory data analysis, for understanding systems and algorithms, for teaching and sharing techniques in code, and for sharing interactive visual explanations...
 

Data Visualization Reading and Videos
 

  • Data Stories Podcast #95 - Challenges of Being a Vis Professional in Industry with Elijah Meeks
    This week, we have Elijah Meeks on the show to talk about the state of data visualization jobs in the industry...In the episode, we talk about what is going on in the data visualization field and whether there really is a problem for data visualization professionals in the industry. We also talk about the great survey Elijah run on the state of the vis industry, which attracted around 1000 responses...
  • A Data Visualization Reading (And Watching) List
    Starting this summer, I'm teaching a course in Data Storytelling and Visualization at the University of Florida as part of its new online Master's program in Audience Analytics...In preparing for the course, I asked my Twitter followers for suggestions of what I should add to my reading list... I received a lot of great suggestions and promised that, once my reading list was complete, I'd share it with others. So here it is...
  • Banning Exploration In My InfoVis Class
    I’ve banned the word “explore” from all project proposals in my InfoVis class. No explore. No exploration. No exploratory. No, you may not create a tool to “allow an analyst to explore"...The line that I use on my students is that: No one is paid to explore, they’re paid to find. I’m only 10% trying to be clever. Ninety percent, I’m dreading grading the output of projects that feature exploration as an objective...
  • Regression by Eye
    Our CHI 2017 paper “Regression by Eye: Estimating Trends in Bivariate Visualizations” investigates two questions: 1) How well do people visually estimate trends in data? and 2) Does the way we visually encode the data bias these estimates?...
 

D3.js Reading and Videos
 

  • D3.annotation: Design & Modes
    An introduction to d3.annotation()...I started this library by gathering examples of annotations that I liked. From those examples, the majority of use cases followed a pattern: a subject (the thing the annotation is annotating), a note, and a connector joining the note to the subject...
  • Britecharts: Eventbrite’s reusable charting library based on D3
    In a previous series of posts about Leveling Up D3, I talked about a different way of building D3.js charts, using the Reusable API, building our components via TDD and improving them with events and refactorings. Following those ideas, and with the help of Eventbrite’s design team, we have been working on our chart library, and now we want to share it with you. It’s called Britecharts...What is Britecharts?...Britecharts is a client-side reusable Charting Library based on D3.js v4 that allows an easy and intuitive use of charts and components that can be composed, creating beautiful visualizations...
  • How (and why) to use D3 with React
    If you’re planning to build a React app with more than a few simple data visualizations, you’ll probably want to pick an approach that: a) is well-documented, proven, and under active development, b) has a relatively expressive interface– meaning it lets you write custom data graphics with just enough verbosity to express what you want, c) plays well with React– that is, it doesn’t need to directly mutate the DOM, and d) gives you plenty of freedom to customize it to suit your app’s needs and visual style...Given the above criteria, these are what I’d consider to be the best available options...
  • Responsive Scrollytelling Best Practices
    I recently wrote an article about how to implement scrollytelling with six different libraries. In this post, we will discuss all things mobile; from planning, to choices, to lessons learned. Let’s get the elephant in the room out of the way first...When do you start on mobile?...

Hope that you had a great past month and that next month is even better!

Wishing you the best, 
Sebastian Gutierrez
@DashingD3js
www.dashingd3js.com

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