Data Visualization and D3.js Newsletter Issue 215

DashingD3js.com Weekly Data Visualization and D3.js Newsletter

Hi Friends -


Welcome to issue 215 of the DashingD3js.com Weekly Newsletter.
 

Onwards to this week's links...
 

Featured
 

  • Data Stories Podcast Episode #89 - Data Vis Around the World in 2016
    For the end of the year we decided to experiment with a new, very special kind of episode. We asked 6 different visualization experts from 6 different countries (and 5 different continents!) to tell us what happened this year in the data visualization space on their side of the world...On the podcast, we have Krisztina Szűcs from Hungary, Blaise Aboh from Nigeria, Simon Ducroquet from Brazil, Nikita Rokotyan from Western Siberia, Simon Elvery from Australia, and Jane Pong from Hong Kong...
  • Popular Blocks
    [Editor's note: Did you know that you could see all the most visited bl.ocks.org? This link has the compilation and is very frequently updated. Also - bl.ocks.org has been around since Sep 2010! How about that. 6+ years!]...
 

Data Visualization Reading and Videos
 

  • Visualizing Distributions
    There is a near infinite variety of visualization methods within our field. Santiago Ortiz’s article, 45 ways to communicate two quantiles, shows us a stunning expanse for just two numbers. FlowingData has given us 9 ways to visualize proportions and 11 ways for changes over time. Many charting taxonomies include distributions, but they only present a few options. Let’s remedy that with a post on the many. We’ll use a single (completely fake) data set so we can easily compare how each chart type displays the same data...
  • Network Visualization With R
    This workshop covers network visualization using the R language for statistical computing and RStudio...The session provides a brief overview of network formats, focusing on their structure and representation in key R packages...The workshop provides a step-by-step guide describing (through series of examples) the path from raw data to graph visualization in the igraph and Statnet frameworks. The advanced portion of the workshop touches on dynamic visualization for longitudinal networks and combining networks with geographic maps. We also discuss ways of converting graphs in R to interactive JavaScript/3D-based visualizations for the Web...
  • The Biggest Stats Lesson Of 2016
    What is the big statistical lesson of 2016? Here at STATS.org, we believe 2016’s major message is that statistical issues should be reported clearly and frequently to avoid miscommunication to lay audiences...Many previous articles have already covered “what went wrong” in forecasting USA's 2016 Presidential election, but how did the media do in covering this “wrongness” from a statistical perspective? We discuss three quantitative issues relevant to the 2016 election predictions and examples from major news outlets where the reporting on these issues was done well...
  • Mapping the Shadows of New York City: Every Building, Every Block
    You’re looking at a map of all of the shadows produced by thousands of buildings in New York City over the course of one day. This inverted view tells the story of the city’s skyline at the ground level...Calculating the length and shape of a shadow cast from a simple object can be easily done with pen, paper and some basic math. But architects use a more sophisticated method known as ray tracing; it simulates the effects a ray of light can have on a building and its surroundings. Most analyses of shadows study just a few buildings at a time. What made it an interesting problem for the researchers [Mr. Silva and Mr. Doraiswamy] at the Tandon School of Engineering at New York University was how to do it at a scale so you could quickly study whole neighborhoods...
 

D3.js Reading and Videos
 

  • Modifying a Force Layout II
    This example modifies a force-layout with transitions for smooth enter and exit. An interesting technique here is the use of transition.attrTween to keep the exiting links connected to the moving nodes, even after the links have been removed from the link selection...
  • Voronoï playground - Do you see the path ? (II)
    No path is visible, only cells !...The idea of this block comes when I look at Voronoï tessellation where (sometimes) paths emerge, due to the smooth chaining of cells's borders. This is put to its extreme in this block...This block is an enhancement of a previous one, where intersections and close path's portions are now handled...
  • Simplex Wave + Explanations
    This block experiments SimplexNoise. More particularly, how to produce a continuous radial noise...Looks at a) Radial wave, b) Continuous-but-unbalanced radial noises, c) Non-continuous radial noises, and d) SimplexNoises...

Hope that you had a great past week and that next week is even better!

Wishing you the best, 
Sebastian Gutierrez
@DashingD3js
www.dashingd3js.com

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