Data Visualization and D3.js Newsletter Issue 189

DashingD3js.com Weekly Data Visualization and D3.js Newsletter

Hi Friends -


Welcome to issue 189 of the DashingD3js.com Weekly Newsletter.
 

Onwards to this week's links...
 

Featured
 

  • Why We Didn’t Use A Cartogram In The Brexit Map
    Great Britain has voted to leave the E.U., and election result cartograms are all over the internet. However, for our map we decided to stick with a simple map instead...While these cartogram are undeniably pieces of beauty, there are still some significant problems...
  • Scatterplot Tour
    This example demonstrates how to implement an animated tour of a scatterplot using zoom transitions. The tour zooms in on each of the clusters in succession before zooming back out to the overview. To compute the appropriate zoom transform for each cluster, first the bounding box of each cluster is computed in non-transformed coordinates...
 

Data Visualization Reading and Videos
 

  • Interactive Flow Visualization In R
    Exploring flows between origins and destinations visually is a common task, but can be difficult to get right. In R, there are many tutorials on the web that show how to produce static flow maps. Over the past couple years, R developers have created an infrastructure to bridge R with JavaScript using the htmlwidgets package, allowing for the generation of interactive web visualizations straight from R. I’d like to demonstrate here a few examples for exploratory interactive flow graphics that use this infrastructure...
  • Good Charts: The Book I Wish I’d Written
    It isn’t often that a book comes out and I say “I wish I’d written that book.” But if I could have double-clicked on the data section of slide:ology and had a book pop out, Good Charts would be the book! It’s a remarkable trek through how data should be explored and displayed—and not just for data scientists and designers, but for everyone. The book’s author Scott Berinato argues that data visualization will soon become an essential workplace skill and that those who learn how to do it well will be the ones who get noticed and contribute to their companies’ success...
  • Novel City Maps: A Poetic View On The City
    How do impressions of a city perceived in fiction change depending on author, time and narration? The project Novel City Maps visualizes spatiality and its relation to the story in Berlin novels in the form of poetic maps that originate from the complex tissue of the underlying stories...
  • Publicize, Don’t Just Publish!
    Publishing your results is an integral part of doing science. Why work on figuring out something new if you’re not going to tell anybody? Exchanging ideas, critiquing them, building on them, and then publishing new ones is the way science works...There is another aspect of publication, though: publicizing and socializing your work...And yet, it’s still rarely done...
  • Six Questions With… Santiago Ortiz
    I've been doing a few interviews with various professionals from data visualisation and related fields. These people span the spectrum of industries, backgrounds, roles and perspectives. I gave each interviewee a selection of questions from which to choose six to respond. This latest interview is with Santiago Ortiz, Head at Moebio Labs...
 

D3.js Reading and Videos
 

  • Barchart Matrix Implemented With D3.js
    Consider the following dataset stored as a table with 6 columns...The first 3 columns in the table are dimensions (independent, categorical variables), and the other 3 columns are measures (dependent, quantitative variables). The measures are functions of the dimensions. Each combination of the values of the dimensions occurs once. Since there are 3 Regions, 12 Months, and 2 Products, there are 3x12x2 = 72 rows...The Barchart Matrix below provides an overview of the data in the table....
  • Using Gradients For Abrupt Color Changes In Data Visualizations
    I’ve already shown the diversity of using gradients in data visualization in several other blogs in this series. But you don’t even have to use gradients as something that runs smoothly from one color to another. They can be very handy for abrupt changes as well. The first time I ended up using this technique was when I became interested in the popularity of baby names...
  • Ian Johnson's Working With Spatial Data - Workshop Materials
    This workshop is designed to be very hands-on, with many examples that can be extended as exercises. It would be impossible to touch everything that we could find interesting in web mapping, so the hope is that after going through these three acts you will feel empowered to swap in your own data and leverage hundreds of examples in your own data visualization projects!...
  • Make Great-looking D3.js Charts In Python Without Coding A Line Of JavaScript
    D3.js is an excellent visualization library due to the ability it gives a developer to gain control over all aspects of visualization. However, its extreme power can often also be a problem -- sometimes, we just want to create a set of standard bar and line charts that look good, without needing to spend hours fine-tuning aspects of charts. This is where nvd3 can come in handy: it is a handy library that offers a set of reusable presets based on d3.js...As a Pythonista, I've particularly enjoyed using Python-nvd3 -- a great library that offers a Python wrapper for the nvd3.js interface. You can create great-looking d3.js charts without ever touching a line of JavaScript. I'll go through a quick bar chart example...

Hope that you had a great past week and that next week is even better!

Wishing you the best, 
Sebastian Gutierrez
@DashingD3js
www.dashingd3js.com

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