Data Visualization and D3.js Newsletter Issue 188

DashingD3js.com Weekly Data Visualization and D3.js Newsletter

Hi Friends -


Welcome to issue 188 of the DashingD3js.com Weekly Newsletter.
 

Onwards to this week's links...
 

Featured
 

  • The Golden Age of Statistical Graphics [PDF]
    Statistical graphics and data visualization have long histories, but their modern forms began only in the early 1800s. Between roughly 1850 and 1900 (±10), an explosive growth occurred in both the general use of graphic methods and the range of topics to which they were applied. Innovations were prodigious and some of the most exquisite graphics ever produced appeared, resulting in what may be called the “Golden Age of Statistical Graphics.”...
  • Every ColorBrewer Scale
    A quick visual reference to every ColorBrewer scale; colors by Cynthia Brewer. Available in CSS and JS format. Click on a palette to log the constituent colors in hexadecimal RGB to the console...
 

Data Visualization Reading and Videos
 

  • Data Stories Podcast #76: Bocoup and OpenVis Conference
    On the show this week we have Irene Ros, Jim Vallandingham, and Yannick Assogba from the data visualization team of Bocoup. We talk about how they collaborate with other groups to create open-source data visualization software. We also talk about OpenVis Conference, the successful and innovative visualization event they organize each year, as well as the cool visualization projects they develop internally...
  • Data Journalism Awards 2016: What The Winners Tell Us About The State Of The Data Nation
    What does data journalism look like in 2016? The winners of the data journalism awards — announced today — give us a great sense of where the industry is right now...Journalism may be facing challenges right now, but there’s never been a better time to be a data journalist. We had a record number of entries and a shortlist which is the strongest in the award’s history...So, in that context, what is the state of the data journalism nation right now? Here are five lessons I learned from the awards this year...
  • Visualizing Bayesian Updating
    One of the most straightforward examples of how we use Bayes to update our beliefs as we acquire more information can be seen with a simple Bernoulli process. That is, a process which has only two possible outcomes...I’ve put together this little piece of R code to help visualize how our beliefs about the probability of success (heads, functioning widget, etc) are updated as we observe more and more outcomes...
  • The Financial Times Guide To Data Visualization
    The Financial Times has been getting serious about the graphs it produces...When Alan Smith took up the newly created data-visualization editor role at the salmon broadsheet last September, he had never worked in a newsroom before...Ten months after Smith’s arrival, here is how the FT is changing its approach to data visualization...
  • Browse More Than 1,000 National Park Maps, All in One Place
    A park ranger has been diligently uploading maps from hundreds of America’s national parks for the enjoyment, education and convenience of all. According to npmaps.com, some 1,053 high-resolution national park maps are available to view, save, and download for free...
 

D3.js Reading and Videos
 

  • Animated Basic Charts In D3 And React
    React and D3 are match made in heaven. In this article we will create basic pie, bar, line charts with event driven animation using D3 for visualization and React for the view, data, and state management. The code samples in this article use the ReactSpeed ES6 Starter Project which you can reuse to speed launch mobile-web apps coded in React, Redux, and ES6...
  • Component-Kit: UI-Kit For Rapidly Creating Dashboards
    I made component-kit a project that mixes both UI and Charting Components. This makes it easier to get a dashboard up and running in a few minutes cake. This Library allows you to create charts individually as well as compose them together...Component-Kit under the hood is powered by React, D3, and React-Faux-DOM. If you're interested in knowing why I chose these three to power this library keep reading, otherwise scroll down to the examples...
  • More Fun Data Visualizations With The Gooey Effect
    In the original blog, I talked about the gooey filter code where in the last step you place the original sharp SVG shape back on top of the blurred version. This makes sure that your shapes will always retain the size that they originally had, which can be very important in data visualizations. However, it does make the gooey filter slightly less beautiful when you are merging different colors...in this blog, I’d like to teach you a few more techniques to take full use of the power of the gooey...
  • rumble-charts
    React components for building composable and flexible charts...It's based on D3.js under the hood, but most of the time you will not feel that...

Hope that you had a great past week and that next week is even better!

Wishing you the best, 
Sebastian Gutierrez
@DashingD3js
www.dashingd3js.com

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