Data Visualization and D3.js Newsletter Issue 171

DashingD3js.com Weekly Data Visualization and D3.js Newsletter

Hi Friends -


Welcome to issue 171 of the DashingD3js.com Weekly Newsletter.
 

Onwards to this week's links...
 

Featured
 

  • Data Visualization For Human Perception
    Data visualization is the graphical display of abstract information for two purposes: sense-making (also called data analysis) and communication...[the] translation of the abstract into physical attributes of vision (length, position, size, shape, and color, to name a few) can only succeed if we understand a bit about visual perception and cognition. In other words, to visualize data effectively, we must follow design principles that are derived from an understanding of human perception...
  • Searching For Examples - Announcing http://blockbuilder.org/search
    I am excited to introduce a new tool into the d3.js examples ecosystem: http://blockbuilder.org/search...After I got Blockbuilder working I realized that we were going to have a lot more blocks on our hands, and in the months since its existed Blockbuilder users have added at least 3,000 blocks to the ecosystem. With this flourishing of blocks people started to notice it was harder and harder to keep track of new and interesting examples. Enter search...
 

Data Visualization Reading and Videos
 

  • Is Data Journalism For Everyone?
    A recent study, conducted by Turo Uskali and Heikki Kuutti from the University of Jyväskylä, asked five prominent data journalists their thoughts on whether all journalists should learn to work with data. We conducted a roundup of their answers...
  • PolicyViz Podcast Episode #33: Chris Parmer from Plotly
    In this week’s episode of the PolicyViz Podcast, I speak to Chris Parmer, Chief Product Officer and co-founder of Plotly, the online data visualization and analytics firm. Chris and I talk about Plotly’s tool, their business model, open source data and programming, and the future of online data visualization tools...
  • Britain's Diet In Data
    The British diet has undergone a transformation in the last half-century. Traditional staples such as eggs, potatoes and butter have gradually given way to more exotic or convenient foods such as aubergines, olive oil and stir-fry packs...Explore the changes across four decades and hundreds of food and drink categories in this interactive visualisation, featuring data from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs...
  • Punctuation In Novels
    When we think of novels, of newspapers and blogs, we think of words. We easily forget the little suggestions pushed in between: the punctuation...Inspired by a series of posters, I wondered what did my favorite books look like without words. Can you tell them apart or are they all a-mush? In fact, they can be quite distinct...
  • The New York Times’s Classic Weather Chart: Now Online With 3,000 Cities
    Today, The New York Times publishes an interactive chart showing detailed temperature and precipitation patterns for 1,801 American cities and 1,334 other locations around the globe for 2015. More than 90 percent of the cities had a warmer-than-average year – local evidence of the fact that 2015 was the hottest year on record...The interactive gives you an opportunity to explore an exceptional year in weather...
 

D3.js Reading and Videos
 

  • Visualising Game Trees With D3.js [London d3.js 2016 February Meetup Video]
    Writing algorithms for Artificial Intelligence is a lot of fun. You end up teaching your software how to move and learn in the environment and how to take actions to survive to obstacles and threats. But this is still software. How do you know your AI is not dumb as doorknobs? How do you test something that thinks and decides in its own terms? How can you be sure it is following your inputs in a strategic way? Join me in this talk as we build an AI for Pac-Man leveraging Monte Carlo Tree Search. With the help of D3.js we'll verify the correctness of the algorithm and enter in the mind of the machine...
  • Immutable.js + d3.js = ? [London d3.js 2016 February Meetup Video]
    D3.js’ component and update patterns easily allow for a more functional or Flux-like approach to visualisation rendering. Converting your render to a pure function of your model makes debugging much easier but often with an associated performance cost. Whilst this isn’t always noticeable in modern desktop browsers, it can be terminal on mobile or legacy browsers...In this talk I’ll look at how immutable.js can be combined with d3.js to produce high performance visualisations, without compromising on your code’s structure...
  • D3 4.0 plugins Via Examples With SVG + Canvas And Functional Reactive Programming
    The next major release of D3 breaks down the diverse library into uncoupled components. Even the core concepts such as d3.selection are in their own optional plugins. The changes yield faster load, separation of concerns and more malleable datavis...We'll look at: a) D3 4.0 plugins in general, b) D3 rendering without the DOM in the data flow with the Flyd FRP for reactive style, and c) mixing SVG and Canvas/WebGL in the same visualisation towards native-like performance even on mobile...
  • Playing with D3 Version 4, React, React-Motion
    Based on the new d3 modules by Mike Bostock, we wanted to find out a bit about the implications that new setup has in a webapp in React...Here we present 3 examples, combining the power of the new d3 Version 4 modules and React (and React-Motion, and Redux)...All three examples provide different findings, see summary at the bottom...
  • Sky
    A map of the sky that uses an azimuthal equidistant projection with star data. Longitudes and latitudes for the geo projection are obtained from declination and right ascension respectively (longitude is also inverted, because, unlike the earth globe, the celestial sphere is seen from the inside)...The boreal (northern) sky is shown at left, while the austral (southern) at right. Because right ascension is given in hours, both maps are divided in 24 slices. A circle is shown every 10 degrees of declination...

Hope that you had a great past week and that next week is even better!

Wishing you the best, 
Sebastian Gutierrez
@DashingD3js
www.dashingd3js.com

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